POETENLADEN - neue Literatur im Netz - Home
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Shakespeare Sonett 66
Übersetzung: U. Erckenbrecht
Shakespeares berühmtes Sonett Nr. 66 hat der Autor Ulrich Ercken­brecht in 154 Varian­ten in deutscher Über­setzung ge­sam­melt und editiert. Schrift­steller wie Stefan George, Karl Kraus, Lion Feucht­wanger, Volker Braun oder Wolf Biermann haben sich an diesem Gedicht versucht. 15 Mal hat der Heraus­geber Ercken­brecht selbst das Sonett über­setzt. Diese 15 Ver­sionen werden, im Anschluss an das Original, hier vor­gestellt (rechtes Menü).

William Shakespeare: Sonnet 66

Tyr'd with all these for restfull death I cry,
As to behold desert a begger borne,
And needie Nothing trimd in iollitie,
And purest faith vnhappily forsworne,
And gilded honor shamefully misplast,
And maiden vertue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgrac'd,
And strength by limping sway disabled,
And arte made tung-tide by authoritie,
And Folly (Doctor-like) controuling skill,
And simple-Truth miscalde Simplicitie,
And captiue-good attending Captaine ill.
Tyr'd with all these, from these would I be gone,
Saue that to dye, I leaue my loue alone.





Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As, to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And guilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled,
And art made tongue-tied by authority,
And folly doctor-like controlling skill,
And simple truth miscall'd simplicity,
And captive good attending captain ill:
Tired with all these, from these would I be gone,
Save that, to die, I leave my love alone.
Ulrich Erckenbrecht    27.03.2010    Druckansicht  Zur Druckansicht - Schwarzweiß-Ansicht    Seite empfehlen  Diese Seite weiterempfehlen
Ulrich Erckenbrecht
Lyrik

Shakespeare Sonett 66